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THIS WEEK'S COMMUNITY SNAPSHOTS

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  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Operation International, based in Southampton, recently returned from a medical mission to Rakai, Uganda, where a population of just under 500,000 people must rely on one local hospital that employs only four physicians.The team of physicians, nurses, clinicians and other volunteers attended to more than 350 impoverished adults and children, delivered $600,000 worth of medical equipment and supplies, and visited three orphanages. “Our medical mission to Uganda was very fulfilling for our entire team,” said Medhat Allam, MD, Operation International’s Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As part of our mission to save as many lives as possible in impoverished countries where people are faced with the lack of quality health services, we performed 72 major complex surgical procedures during 16-hour days on congenital anomalies, severe burn reconstructions, benign and malignant tumors.” “We experienced many miracles such as this: A woman in labor was facing a near-death situation. She could not deliver her child, and its heartbeat had stopped. Our team performed a C-section to save the mother, and then performed CPR to bring her baby girl back to life. It was a heartwarming moment witnessing the look on the mother’s face as she heard her child cry for the first time after entering the world,” added Dr. Allam.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • EAst Quogue Elementary School student Julia Stabile is the May Student of the Month.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • As part of their social studies curriculum, Sag Harbor Elementary School fourth-graders in Jeff Reed’s class created a comprehensive map of early America. Applying their knowledge on the subject, the students drew chalk grid lines on a 10-foot sheet of paper, charted latitude and longitude, and sketched in the Western Hemisphere.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Tuckahoe School seventh-grader Mallory Corwith took first place in a contest in which students built a truss bridge and the winning bridge could support the most weight.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Westhampton Beach Elementary School kindergartners diagnosed and treated their stuffed friends as part of a Stony Brook University Teddy Bear Clinic, held at their school on May 14. Students learned about health, hygiene, and bike and car safety before bandaging their teddy bears.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • : Hampton Bays Middle School eighth-graders Braeden Dorchak and Elle Dunkirk shared a classroom experience during a podcast recording session with school library media specialist Meghan Bishop, left, and teacher Carolanne Mazur.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 25</span>
  • Members of Westhampton Beach High School’s Virtual Enterprise class presented all elementary students in the district with a packet of sunflower seeds featuring a special poem. The gesture aimed to encourage young children to appreciate the earth’s natural beauty by planting the seeds and watching the flowers grow over the summer. The seeds were purchased at a discount from True Value in Westhampton Beach as part of a Town of Southampton Youth Bureau community action grant that the VE class had applied for.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 24</span>
  • A pair of Special Olympic teams came out to Westhampton Beach Learning Center at BOCES on Old Riverhead Road on May 12 to compete in basketball. The Learning Center's teams practiced most of the year to participate in the Special Olympics that were originally scheduled to be at Westhampton Beach High School, but it did not get enough interest to host the games. As not to disapoint the WHB Learning Center hosted two teams from Commack at the Learning Center. The teams had a friendly bagel breakfast, played two games and finished the morning with dancing and pizza. Westhampton Beach  won both games, 24-22 and 24-18. The Learning Center thanked Joe Cassidy and Pat Ottati who volunteered their officiating skills to make the games more enjoyable.
Top row, left to right, Coach Steve, Giovanni U., Andrew M., Jacob C., Joey M., Anthony C., George A., Joe Cassidy. Bottom row, left to right, Briasiah J., Kelvin, Keith R., Coach Linda and Albert W.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • A pair of Special Olympic teams came out to Westhampton Beach Learning Center at BOCES on Old Riverhead Road on May 12 to compete in basketball. The Learning Center's teams practiced most of the year to participate in the Special Olympics that were originally scheduled to be at Westhampton Beach High School, but it did not get enough interest to host the games. As not to disapoint the WHB Learning Center hosted two teams from Commack at the Learning Center. The teams had a friendly bagel breakfast, played two games and finished the morning with dancing and pizza. Westhampton Beach  won both games, 24-22 and 24-18. The Learning Center thanked Joe Cassidy and Pat Ottati who volunteered their officiating skills to make the games more enjoyable.
 Coach- Steve , Giovanni U, Andrew M., Jacob C., Joey M., Anthony C., George A., Joe Cassidy, Briasiah J., Kelvin, Keith R. Coach Linda and Albert W.<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Westhampton Beach firefighters make quick work of a car fire at a drill held at their headquarters on a rainy May 16 evening. Such drills allow the volunteers to practice skills they will need in real life situations and are particularly useful for new department members. COURTESY WESTHAMPTON BEACH FIRE DEPARTMENT<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Westhampton Beach firefighters make quick work of a car fire at a drill held at their headquarters on a rainy May 16 evening. Such drills allow the volunteers to practice skills they will need in real life situations and are particularly useful for new department members. COURTESY WESTHAMPTON BEACH FIRE DEPARTMENT<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Juliet Garrett performs her original songs at the yard sale to benefit the Sag Harbor Cinema on Saturday at the Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor.     TOM KOCHIE<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • A yard sale to benefit the Sag Harbor Cinema was held on Saturday at Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor. TOM KOCHIE<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Bella Carone, 6, of Hampton Bays gets a kiss from her dog Brodie at the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation's  second annual fundraising dog walk and picnic, “Paws In The Park”, on Saturday at Red Creek Park in Hampton Bays.  DANA SHAW<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Erin Albanese with Daisey and Bailey at the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation's second annual fundraising dog walk and picnic, “Paws In The Park”, on Saturday at Red Creek Park in Hampton Bays.    DANA SHAW<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • John and Emerald Stella at the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation's second annual fundraising dog walk and picnic, “Paws In The Park”, on Saturday at Red Creek Park in Hampton Bays. DANA SHAW<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Kiara Fikir with Todd at the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation's second annual fundraising dog walk and picnic, “Paws In The Park”, on Saturday at Red Creek Park in Hampton Bays. DANA SHAW<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Montauk Music Festival took place last weekend with music on the main stage on the hamlet greet and at various pubs and restaurants in downtown Montauk. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Montauk Music Festival took place last weekend with music on the main stage on the hamlet greet and at various pubs and restaurants in downtown Montauk. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons hosted a preview party for its annual plant sale on Friday evening at the Bridgehampton Community House. Jack Lenor Larsen, founder of LongHouse Reserve, was honored at the event. The sale opened to the public the following day. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons hosted a preview party for its annual plant sale on Friday evening at the Bridgehampton Community House. Jack Lenor Larsen, founder of LongHouse Reserve, was honored at the event. The sale opened to the public the following day. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons hosted a preview party for its annual plant sale on Friday evening at the Bridgehampton Community House. Jack Lenor Larsen, founder of LongHouse Reserve, was honored at the event. The sale opened to the public the following day. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Eastville Community Historical Association sponsored a walking tour of the historic Eastville neighborhood Saturday, led by Georgette Grier-Key. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • The Eastville Community Historical Association sponsored a walking tour of the historic Eastville neighborhood Saturday, led by Georgette Grier-Key. KYRIL BROMLEY<br/><span style='font-style:italic'>Submitted May 21</span>
  • Members Of 106th Rescue Wing Visit Tuckahoe School To Thank Students For Their Support