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May 15, 2018 3:28 PMPublication: The Southampton Press

Manna Fish Farm Stuck On Sandbar Near Entrance To Shinnecock Canal

The Manna Fish Farm buoy in Shinnecock Bay on Tuesday afternoon.  DANA SHAW
May 17, 2018 1:35 PM

The bright yellow Manna Fish Farms feeder buoy attempted to make its way from the Shinnecock Canal to the Shinnecock Inlet on Tuesday morning when it got stuck on a sandbar just south of Prime Marina Southampton.

The 60-ton buoy, owned by Donna Lanzetta, CEO and owner of Manna Fish Farms Inc., will be part of the first open-sea fish farm—it can hold up to 20 tons of food—on the East End. The plan is to outfit it with a dozen 70-foot-wide cages, called “Sea Station Cages,” which would be submerged some 60 feet below the surface to house an assortment of different fish species, though only one species at a time, that Ms. Lanzetta’s company would farm.

The buoy is currently stuck near the entrance to the Shinnecock Canal, according to Southampton Town Senior Bay Constable Albert Tuzzolo, who said that its current position is not interfering with navigation or transit to the canal.

Les Trafford, the owner of Sea Tow in Hampton Bays, attempted to move the enormous feeder from the dock near Cowfish, the waterfront restaurant in Hampton Bays, using two commercial fishing boats with approximately 1,200-horsepower on Tuesday morning.

The buoy was initially supposed to be moved by a tug company out of New Bedford, which Mr. Trafford declined to identify; however, a main engine on the company’s 65-foot, 1,600-horsepower tugboat blew on Tuesday and will take approximately a week to repair.

“We didn’t want to make anyone angry, so we’re trying to get it out of there,” Mr. Trafford said, noting that the buoy was only supposed to be at the Cowfish dock for one week, but it has been there for about two. “It’s not going so good.”

The team was expected to be out again at high tide on Tuesday at about 7 p.m. to try to get it to its temporary destination in the inlet.

Ms. Lanzetta explained that she is currently working with the United States Army Corps of Engineers to obtain permits to moor it offshore, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to conduct an alternative site analysis. She added that they are currently looking at eight potential sites; however, her preferred site is about 8 miles offshore.

Ms. Lanzetta’s hope is to start the farm with either striped bass or steelhead trout, explaining that the temperature profile near the preferred site would lend itself well to the rearing of those species.

“We’re going to continue the process every high tide until we get it over there,” she said.

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OK, I'll bite that hook. What is a "field head trout"? There's no reference to this species that I can find. A typo? Pacific Steelhead Trout perhaps? If so I'll be first in line to oppose its cultivation in the Atlantic where it is an alien species.
By Just sitting on the taffrail (21), Southampton on May 15, 18 6:06 PM
Concur. I’m against any open water farming. The fry will come from a farm, most likely GMO...

REAL FISH DONT EAT PELLETS!!!
By Draggerman (772), Southampton on May 15, 18 6:50 PM
There is NO GMO's involved
By sandydog21 (188), Southampton on May 17, 18 7:51 AM
An accidental release of Steelheads could wreak havoc with ongoing efforts to restore our native Atlantic Salmon. Millions have been spent to restore the population of this legendary native fish.
By Just sitting on the taffrail (21), Southampton on May 15, 18 6:16 PM
Les TRAFFORD. Poorly written
By bigfresh (3446), north sea on May 15, 18 6:34 PM
1 member liked this comment
No drama - No gmo - no hybrids - simply awaiting the high tide to move the buoy across the bay - striped bass (native - not hybrid) is preferred species. Steelhead has been listed as an possible indigenous alternative. No antibiotics - plan to create jobs and revitalize our working waterfront, without harm to the environment. The automated feed buoy is here as we work on it to increase battery storage, and integrate wave energy.
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 15, 18 7:07 PM
1 member liked this comment
I’ve never seen a steelhead locally. I’ve seen them in BC.

I’ve seen first hand how devastating open water farming can be. Sorry, not a fan. If NMFS would remove cranium from rectum, they could see that the ideology the employ to “protect” the fish stocks is actually depleting them. And the fact that you will be regulated by these geniuses scares the crap out of me. I’m sure you believe in your science, and I wish you well. But I’m scared... NMFS, ...more
By Draggerman (772), Southampton on May 15, 18 8:20 PM
You have a personal vested interest in this that you aren't disclosing.
By even flow (626), East Hampton on May 15, 18 8:34 PM
No dog in this fight. NMFS and the DEC took me out of the fight years ago.
By Draggerman (772), Southampton on May 15, 18 9:09 PM
I was accurate. It wasn't hard to tell.
By even flow (626), East Hampton on May 16, 18 7:52 AM
My Nom De Plume, Draggerman.

A Draggerman is one who works on Draggers, aka Trawlers. I was a commercial fisherman for most of my life. But, alas, I don't work the deck anymore due to misinformed government employees trying to manage chaos.

So no, I don't have a vested interest. I just have 25 years experience on the water.
By Draggerman (772), Southampton on May 16, 18 4:58 PM
Ok... Second bite but I'm on the edge of spitting the hook. Who made the oxymoronic suggestion that Steelhead (Sea-run form of coastal Rainbow Trout) were a "possible indigenous alternative" (in the Atlantic I assume) given that they are only native to the Northern Pacific Basin? goo.gl/5DyQbP

This is eerily similar to attempts at promoting the farming of Pacific oysters on the Atlantic coast in the 50's. Originally introduced into the Delaware Bay as a test they brought an oyster disease ...more
By Just sitting on the taffrail (21), Southampton on May 16, 18 6:40 PM
1 member liked this comment
Also as to the fry - we are currently engaged in a striped bass genetic study with Univ of RI, to ensure proper match with our local species. Please consider supporting ocean farming - it is a proven option to provide protein to feed our growing population - without harm to the environment. please watch for public forums where you can please come and learn more. We look forward to answering all questions.
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 15, 18 7:12 PM
1 member liked this comment
So many inaccuracies in your story - what I did mention you left out. The buoy has been at prime marina since last august - without incident. The aquapods are 70 feet in diameter - not 200!
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 15, 18 7:39 PM
1 member liked this comment
Good responses, informative but not argumentative. Nice to see that here any time.
By Funbeer (233), Southampton on May 15, 18 11:42 PM
Good Luck Donna! Wish you much success!
Robin E
By Summer Resident (217), Southampton Town, NY on May 16, 18 3:44 AM
interesting idea but here's an observation, was it wise to invest time and money in the feeding station before securing a single permit from the myriad agencies involved? Army Corps and NOAA are mentioned but how about the DEC? Anyone landing fish for sale in NY MUST have a food fish license , there's a moratorium at this time. Landing bass in NY? You must have your food fish license and a PROVEN HISTORY OF LANDING BASS , the cut off date for that history was in the early 90's , the fisherman ...more
By bigfresh (3446), north sea on May 17, 18 6:28 AM
Additionally, any fish in the pens have the very real potential of escaping due to normal wear and tear of the pens and extreme weather events causing damage to the same. Non native species have caused problems on the west coast when "foreign" strains of salmon have escaped and spread disease among the native population and now compete for both forage and spawning areas. As I stated this is an interesting idea but there are some issues to address before it becomes a reality.
By bigfresh (3446), north sea on May 17, 18 6:33 AM
2 members liked this comment
I agree - there is much to address and study - which we have been doing since our first pre permit meeting in 2015. The us army CORP is our lead agency - We are working on the automated feed system now to increase battery storage and integrate wave energy. We will be able to power out, then use the wave energy to work around the farm. The feed system is a prototype- purchased from the university of New Hampshire. The feed buoy was used for a few years off isle of shoals, then the university finished ...more
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 18, 18 12:33 AM
I agree - there is much to address and study - which we have been doing since our first pre permit meeting in 2015. The us army CORP is our lead agency - We are working on the automated feed system now to increase battery storage and integrate wave energy. We will be able to power out, then use the wave energy to work around the farm. The feed system is a prototype- purchased from the university of New Hampshire. The feed buoy was used for a few years off isle of shoals, then the university finished ...more
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 18, 18 12:33 AM
University of New Hampshire has been farming steelhead for several years off new castle N H.
Striped bass is our preferred species - we shall see.
Very importantly- manna fish farms is committed to 100% transparency- and we will constantly monitor water quality and benthic conditions.
We will never farm hybrids, and we willl farm only indigenous species.
Submerged cages will be utilized - we are involved in a genetic study now to ensure that we stock native strains.
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 18, 18 12:41 AM
Note - the buoy (not stuck) continued its progress across Shinnecock Bay this evening with the high tide - thank you to Captain Les Trafford of Sea Tow, East End Dive Walter Britton, Scott from the Patriot - and the dive team. Your hard work is greatly appreciated!
By Lanzetta & Associates (8), East Quogue on May 18, 18 12:48 AM
FYI - this comments section is just for us to make stuff up and argue, take your thoughtful statements elsewhere please.
By adlkjd923ilifmac.aladfksdurwp (489), southampton on May 18, 18 9:17 AM
Natural fish do not eat pellets and are not contained to any area or swim in they’re own feces. There is no arguement here, farmed fish are NOT natural fish! This POS thing is a nuisance. Support LOCAL ORGANIC SUSTAINABLE fish
By Howser (6), Hampton bays on May 19, 18 11:26 AM
1 member liked this comment
farming is an exploitation of an environment, land or sea. the sea will carry away waste and deposit it somewhere else from where the 'cages' are. you will only know the long term effects after a 'long term'. end of story.
By sstorch (22), water milll on May 21, 18 6:34 AM
Farming is working in tandem WITH the environment. You couldn't be more inaccurate if your life depended on it. Your statement, while attempting to sound lofty was actually totally void of substance. Sounds like it's a trend. Somewhere along the way you fooled people.
By even flow (626), East Hampton on May 21, 18 8:25 AM
1 member liked this comment
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