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Sep 29, 2010 2:00 PMPublication: The Southampton Press

Debate over Jewish religious boundary begins to heat up

Sep 29, 2010 2:00 PM

Opposition continues to stir over plans to establish an eruv in western Southampton Town, near Westhampton Beach and Quogue villages, even though a formal application for the symbolic Jewish religious boundary has yet to materialize before either the village or Southampton Town.

Throughout September, after a renewed push for the religious boundary surfaced, local residents have sent dozens of letters and e-mails to the three municipalities, opposing the creation of an eruv that would encompass all of Westhampton Beach and Quiogue, and parts of Quogue and Westhampton. An eruv is a mostly invisible boundary that allows Orthodox Jews to carry and push certain objects on the Sabbath—activities that are normally prohibited on their holy day. It is typically delineated with black markings affixed to utility poles.

In late August, Westhampton Beach Mayor Conrad Teller announced that he had caught wind of a possible application for a larger eruv than the one originally proposed two years ago by the Hampton Synagogue in Westhampton Beach. The earlier application, which was later withdrawn by the Sunset Avenue synagogue, called for a religious boundary only in Westhampton Beach.

Marvin Tenzer, the head of a nonprofit called East End Eruv Association, later confirmed that his group is now considering establishing a larger eruv in that general area, and has contacted utility companies about marking poles. Mr. Tenzer, a resident of Westhampton Beach and a partner in the law firm Tenzer and Lunin LLP in Manhattan, did not return calls over the past two weeks inquiring about the status of his proposal.

Opposition to the latest eruv application is centered in Westhampton Beach, where a similar application filed by the synagogue in 2008 sparked protests from residents. Over the past month, residents have sent more than 20 letters and e-mails to village officials in Westhampton Beach, expressing opposition to any future eruv proposals in the area. They have also sent a handful of similar letters to officials in Quogue Village and Southampton Town.

“I strongly oppose the creation of an eruv and anything religious that imposes on others,” wrote Mark Mitzner, who identified himself in a letter to Mr. Teller as a resident of the village who is Jewish. “The people that are attempting this outrage are the people who are intolerant. If the eruv is created I would hope every other recognized religion would place their insignia on the telephone poles.”

The group Jewish People Opposed to the Eruv, which formed to protest the 2008 application, has reemerged as a force in the mounting opposition. A meeting of the group drew scores of people to Starr Boggs restaurant in Westhampton Beach on Sunday, September 26, according to Chairman Arnold Sheiffer.

Mr. Sheiffer, who lives Westhampton Beach, said he thinks the Hampton Synagogue is behind the current proposal, even though Mr. Tenzer, who is listed as a founder in the synagogue’s list of benefactors, said the house of worship was not involved. Mr. Sheiffer accused Rabbi Marc Schneier, the founding rabbi of the synagogue, of having a financial stake in his house of worship, adding that the rabbi is only seeking to increase the value of his investment by establishing an eruv around it.

Rabbi Schneier has not returned calls seeking comment over the past month.

Mr. Sheiffer, who is Jewish, said concerns over the government’s involvement in religious matters drives his group’s opposition. “We don’t believe a governmental body should segregate a portion of any area to one particular group, whether religious or otherwise,” he said. “We believe that the communities we live in are secular communities where all religions are treated the same.”

The chairman also said an eruv would “change the character of the neighborhood” by turning the area into an “enclave of just ultra-Orthodox Jewish people” and lower property values. He said anti-Semitism was not at the heart of the opposition to the eruv.

But Clint Greenbaum, a Westhampton Beach resident and one of two people to write to the village in support of an eruv, said those concerns are “laughable,” and designed to conjure fear and mask anti-Orthodox discrimination. The opposition, he said, is making the issue seem bigger than it is.

“An eruv is only something that allows you to push a baby’s stroller or a wheelchair, or carry keys or a prayer shawl on the Sabbath. That’s it,” said Mr. Greenbaum, who attends services at Hampton Synagogue but said he would not benefit from the eruv. “The eruv is so invisible that you literally have to give a map to people because you don’t know where it is.”

A woman named Carol Schechter also wrote a letter to Mr. Teller and Southampton Town officials on September 22, calling the opposition to the eruv “blatant anti-Semitism.”

“An eruv would not physically change anything in the town,” she wrote. “It will allow those with small children to push a carriage on the Sabbath, and allow those in a wheelchair to go to services by being able to be pushed. It will allow my diabetic friend to be able to bring her syringes and insulin to the synagogue on the Sabbath.”

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From the article: "The chairman also said an eruv would “change the character of the neighborhood” by turning the area into an “enclave of just ultra-Orthodox Jewish people” and lower property values. He said anti-Semitism was not at the heart of the opposition to the eruv."

Taking a position that something would definitely happen, without any evidence, and then stating that a group of people will "lower property values" is bigotry. Targeting your statement about "a group of people" to ...more
By sirpoochala (78), Hampton Bays on Sep 30, 10 6:42 PM
Please.... Can I nail the Easter Bunny to every pole and walk freely?
By bobba (39), southampton on Sep 30, 10 8:56 PM
2 members liked this comment
This is not about out anti-Semitism...... anyone that thinks negative is automatically labeled as one, and that is wrong!.This is a community, one that has deep roots and really would not like change from its Garden City Irish Catholic Roots. If you look at where the Immaculate Conception Church is situated you would NEVER get that approved in todays zoning climate. So some very close evaluation for the ERUV is well deserved. ANd the slight of hand on how the original House of Shineier was built ...more
By bobba (39), southampton on Sep 30, 10 9:10 PM
It would seem that the bane of the issue is the Rabbi himself.

He has the most to gain from an eruv, and is hardly a "man of God". Gold, maybe, but seemingly not God.

Of course, nor am I, but I am agnostic...
Sep 30, 10 9:48 PM appended by Mr. Z
Don't take this the wrong way, but, if you can't abide by the laws of your "faith", maybe it's just not for you. Of course, modernization of halacha may be unavoidable. I guess everything muust evolve, including religion. Have any parties considered conversion? But then, you would have to change what you "believe". That would be a neat trick...
By Mr. Z (11665), North Sea on Sep 30, 10 9:48 PM
1 member liked this comment
Ok so no one is picking up on the stupidity of "It will allow my diabetic friend to be able to bring her syringes and insulin to the synagogue on the Sabbath.”

Not taking prescribed medication is just dumb. Of course being so observant she won't be driving when she slips into a diabetic coma.

While I am on it, where are the Catholics? I have a fish bone to pick with them this Friday
By Hambone (513), New York on Sep 30, 10 10:53 PM
1 member liked this comment
I find that statement very odd and perplexing. I am very true to my Christian faith, but I would NEVER be part of a faith, club, organization that would forbid me to carry diabetic supplies, or any medication, under ANY circumstance.

Hambone, you are correct that is just dumb.
By Eliza (29), Westhampton Beach on Oct 1, 10 12:11 PM
"Rabbi Schneier ... who is Jewish" lol
By cochise316 (58), southampton on Sep 30, 10 11:35 PM
This is ridiculous, why should the vast amount of people who this doesn't affect have to look at any demarcation of this boundary. Make up little maps for those who can't follow the rules of their faith and let that be the end of it.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 1:49 AM
1 member liked this comment
I am told that the rabbi can waive those rules so that people can attend easily. Why doesn't he? I believe this is an internal religious struggle between some members of the synagogue and the rabbi. Why must the government become the "tiebreaker"?
By freelance (21), Westhampton Beach on Oct 2, 10 8:41 AM
In the United States we believe in freedom of religion, and feel government should not favor any particular one. I think Jewish people should view the entire country as an eruv, which would require no boundary markings. We should all feel free to go about our business without the need to mark our territory.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 1, 10 7:04 AM
2 members liked this comment
GOOD answer!!! The whole thing makes some of the smartest people in the world look STUPID! As you say, the USA is the freest place in the world to practice ANY religion. There can easily be an orthodox rabbinical decree that the boundaries of this free country are the boundaries in which the orthodox can consider and official ERUV. After all an ERUV is just a scam phony way to get around ancient and truly antiquated rules anyway.
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 6:50 PM
Why should any religious group have the right to make any sort of marking anywhere other than their own property?
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 7:10 AM
2 members liked this comment
we have taken the pledge of allegiance out of school...people do not want God in our schools
simple answer...NO
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 7:14 AM
1 member liked this comment
When did we take the pledge of allegiance out of school? What does God in schools have to do with the topic?
By dagdavid (646), southampton on Oct 1, 10 8:12 AM
1 member liked this comment
God has alot to do with this topic. People wanted God removed from the school...If you want God taken out of public places...
There is no reason on Gods green earth that we should allow this....NO
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 8:23 AM
What people wanted God removed from which school? I work in a public school where we say the pledge every morning. We do teach religion in a manner that is respectful of all beliefs. Personally, I believe God is still here no matter who wants to have him removed.
By mterry (5), Flanders on Oct 1, 10 9:31 AM
Technically via the "separation of Church, and State", "God" should not be mentioned in the pledge, or on our money.

We have a percentage of atheists in this country, and that infringes on their beliefs, though they are not a "majority".

To follow the ordained rules, "God" should not be mentioned in any material referential to government.
By Mr. Z (11665), North Sea on Oct 1, 10 3:29 PM
Although I understand your point of view, I don't believe it is unreasonable for atheists to have to tolerate references to God in American History and traditions. I do however believe it would be very inappropriate to force an atheist to actively participate in prayer or worship in any way. Teaching respect and tolerance for the beliefs of others is very important and necessary in today's world.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 3:22 PM
"One nation, of us all, indivisible, with Liberty, and Justice for all."
By Mr. Z (11665), North Sea on Oct 5, 10 11:31 PM
It is perplexing to me that a civic government is being asked to amend a religious law!!! Separation of church and state folks - civic government is under no obligation to act on this, Its not a question of intolerance, its simply law. Civic government should not even consider it, case closed. Let religion change the laws of religion.
By North of Highway (280), Westhampton Beach on Oct 1, 10 8:28 AM
4 members liked this comment
Opens the door for Sharia and everything else.
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 8:34 AM
That is truly the most vile comment yet. The connection you are trying to make is abundantly clear and you should be ashamed of yourself.
By progressnow (556), sag harbor on Oct 1, 10 10:08 AM
tell me what is vile? everyone in America has the right to free speach
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:45 AM
You should be ashamed of yourself! Explain yourself!
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:47 AM
Kseal, you are comparing a request for subtle demarcations that will have absolutely no effect on anyone who does not wish to observe them with Sharia law and you think that is OK? What you are attempting to do is equate this with fears and hatred of Islam that are currently so prevalent in this country and it is vile and despicable. What you are attempting to do is equate Jews with radical Islam. Deny it all you want, but your intent is clear.

The first amendment protects you from prosecution ...more
By progressnow (556), sag harbor on Oct 1, 10 11:51 AM
Good point progressnow, equating Jews with radical Islam is perfectly rational, given that our unwavering, unjustified and insensible support of Israel has fueled the fervor found in the Islamic world. If you think our support of Israel isn't a large part of why Islamic terrorists target us and our interest you are in denial.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 2:04 PM
Oh, and let's not forget the Israelis stealing Palestinian land in the West Bank to date they have taken over 60% of the West Bank and the settlement continues. Think this may slightly bother Muslims?
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 2:15 PM
Ice, How is that relevant to this conversation?
By dagdavid (646), southampton on Oct 1, 10 3:22 PM
whoops! just found an anti Semite! Israel is one of the most productive and important countries in the world. Medicine, science, invention and technological gifts to the world exceed all others. They are our strongest and most important ally and what stands between us and the islamic nightmare. The entire world should be supporting this extraordinary little country BUT for jealousy, envy and anti-antisemitism. Islam is out to destroy Israel AND ALL OF US. Only the worst of fools would equate it ...more
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 7:00 PM
After seven countries and 200,000 million Arab muslimes tried to kill all Jews in a modern holocaust and got their asses kicked and lost some land you call that STEALING land?! Pure irrational anti-Antisemitism!!!
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 7:03 PM
Israel is a liability for the USA, the are of no value to us. Our support for them is one of the main reasons we even have to think about Islamic extremists attacking us. Which is so over exaggerated that if it weren't destroying our freedoms it would be comical. Israel is in continuing violation of UN laws with respect to their conduct in Palestine.
Now anyone who equates the disapproval of Israeli policy and the use of our tax money to enable them to continue to commit war crimes as anti-semitism ...more
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:40 PM
Guess your lucky it was 200 million Germans!
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:45 PM
Now that you brought up the Holocaust lets look at this objectively, There were approximately 6,000,000 Jews and 5,000,000 non Jews killed, but you never hear a peep about the non Jews. This seems like anti-goyism.
Now if you really want to shed some tears about genocide look at Stalin's 23,000,000 or Mao Zedong's 49-78,000,000. Oh never mind more Goys, they don't count. And you want to call me racist? I don't call myself one of the chosen people, that to me seems inherently racist.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:58 PM
When you get a chance to take a break from your Arab Muslim hating, read some of Norman Finkelstein's books and maybe you will learn something about your people. Interesting stories he has of Muslims helping Jews escape the Nazi's in North Africa.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 11:01 PM
Goy | goi |

noun ( pl. goy-im | 'goi-im | or goys ) informal often offensive

a Jewish name for a non-Jew.

Funny how the people who cry anti-semitism and racist are the one who have a term for everyone who is not like them. This is the pinnacle of bigotry.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 11:12 PM
No need to answer all the verbal diarrhea. Anyone reading what you think and write clan clearly see from what and whence it comes
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 11:26 PM
LOL.... Facts are Facts Jack!
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 12:42 AM
Ice, your bigotry is blindingly obvious! Shameful.
By fcmcmann (417), Hampton Bays on Oct 2, 10 10:28 AM
Your reading comprehension is what is truly shameful!
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 4:07 PM
fcmcmann - you consistent and liberal use of the terms hate, bigot(ed) and racist just lets me know I'm on the right track for if what I had written was anything, but factual you would have some form of legitimate rebuttal. Instead you give your opinion which is not worth much considering it is based on emotions and not facts.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 4:23 PM
I find it distressing that Islam and Muslems are automatically associated with terrorism spawned in the Middle East. The truth is that charismatic political leaders who perhaps claim to be holy men in that part of the world have been able to recruit poor young men to do their bidding in a fabricated holy war that has nothing to do with Islam. Throughout history evil people have manipulated religious beliefs trick others into committing unholy and sinful acts in the name of God.
Oct 3, 10 4:16 PM appended by METCOMedia
Throughout history, evil people have manipulated religious beliefs to trick others into committing unholy and sinful acts in the name of God.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 4:16 PM
Sir do some reading...Please. Your spewing ignorant generalizations...
By Soundview (89), Hampton bays on Oct 6, 10 2:50 PM
I have done some reading. You can disagree without being dismissive and insulting.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 7, 10 12:56 AM
we want to move forward...not backwarrds
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 8:54 AM
If it is sinful for Orthodox Jews to carry and push certain objects on the Sabbath in one neighborhood it should be equally sinful in another! Government has no business getting involved with this. One neighborhood should not be any more or less friendly to any particular religious belief than another.
By mterry (5), Flanders on Oct 1, 10 9:17 AM
2 members liked this comment
My original response to this topic was indifferent. I thought it would be a good idea to allow the eruv token demarcations in exchange for demolition of the so- called "Rabbi's House" at the Hamptons Synagogue and its replacement by a parking lot. ("The Rabbi's House" was permitted as part of a non-conforming use variance ten years ago with the understanding that it be the Rabbi's HOME. Marc Schneier never lived there and it was quickly converted [illegally] into a catering hall and auditorium ...more
By highhatsize (4177), East Quogue on Oct 1, 10 10:19 AM
You my friend make the most sense on this board. Good on ye!
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 1, 10 12:03 PM
Hey, highhatsize, what happened, you couldn't find a way to make this about the police so you invented an entirely new irrelevancy?
By peoplefirst (787), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 12:08 PM
1 member liked this comment
Hey peoplefirst what happened you could find anything factual to rebut what hhs said, so you introduce something truly irrelevant to the thread?
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 2:08 PM
How is it irrelevant?

The Temple requires the approval of an authority yet it is the same authority they flouted in the past.

I think Highhat is on the mark and has the marbles to say it. You can't have it both ways. If you want a government approval in one area it has to go for all areas it is not la carte and what is more galling is that if it were a private citizen..let's say you or me...they'd have us ripping out any changes.
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 2, 10 8:43 PM
What is the use of religious restrictions if there is a way to avoid them?
By Noah Way (450), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 10:22 AM
1 member liked this comment
Riiight!!!
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 7:06 PM
the answer is the use of invisible clear plastic eruvs that are used elsewhere.
By EastEnd68 (888), Westhampton on Oct 1, 10 10:46 AM
NO religious crap of any kind....i don't care if its clear or whatever...No
By kseal (37), southampton on Oct 1, 10 11:19 AM
1 member liked this comment
Apparently God should have worked an 8th day and created sidewalks that are universally acceptable. Sorry, one religion should not have special privileges. Not anti-semitic, but if you say yes to this you set a precedent and have to cave to the wishes of any other religion looking for special consideration. I don't care how large or small the request is. Worship in a place of worship and leave the streets and sidewalks for their intended purposes.
By double standard (1506), quogue on Oct 1, 10 11:22 AM
3 members liked this comment
please explain the "privilege" that is begin sought and how it would effect the lives of anyone beyond those who wish to observe the demarcations
By progressnow (556), sag harbor on Oct 1, 10 11:47 AM
1 member liked this comment
progressnow is right on! double standard and others are completely misrepresenting what is actually being requested here. Why? Explain how this would have any effect whatsoever on your life.
By fcmcmann (417), Hampton Bays on Oct 1, 10 11:55 AM
It is indeed a privilege being requested by one particular group. If it were not why bother with an application in the first place? Worship as you please, but don't ask for special considerations. Where and when do you say no? Yes to one group is yes to all.
FCM - honestly it doesn't effect me at all. My opposition is based on precedent. Are you arguing against that? Do you think a precedent will not be set?
By double standard (1506), quogue on Oct 1, 10 12:09 PM
If it has not effect on you, then why oppose it at all? And as far as a precedent being set, who cares? I am an agnostic and don't follow any religion but I could care less if Catholics, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, or Atheists want to put a black marking on a utility pole.
By fcmcmann (417), Hampton Bays on Oct 1, 10 12:16 PM
How about a 20 foot inflatable Budha? How about little biblical passages posted on every telephone pole? Your missing the point. BTW - people are entitled to an opinion even if they are not directly effected by this or that. You don't have to be shot at to oppose a war do you?
By double standard (1506), quogue on Oct 1, 10 12:27 PM
Yes, you're right, a small black demarcation on a utility post is the same as a 20 foot inflatable Buddha. You are using hyperbole to rationalize the irrational.
By fcmcmann (417), Hampton Bays on Oct 1, 10 12:33 PM
And you confuse your opinion for fact. I simply stated my opinion on the subject as is my right.
By double standard (1506), quogue on Oct 1, 10 12:40 PM
As he said it is the precedent that this consideration will set. It is a can of worms that should not be opened.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 2:19 PM
I think the idea of marking neighborhoods as Orthodox Jew friendly implies that others are not. If it is ok for a mother to push a baby carriage in Westhampton Beach but it is a sin to do it in East Quogue on the Sabbath, it may create perceived discrimination. I think as an inclusive society, this issue is very disturbing to some of us.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 1:01 AM
I may cut the string every Friday and start an Ortodox taxi service...no door handles or doors for that matter! I could be rich I tell you. Rich!
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 1, 10 12:06 PM
How many posting here have actually read the article and even attempted to learn what this is about? As is says above, "An eruv is a mostly invisible boundary that allows Orthodox Jews to carry and push certain objects on the Sabbath—activities that are normally prohibited on their holy day. It is typically delineated with black markings affixed to utility poles"

How does having a piece of black tape on a utility pole have any more of an effect on your life than say a sign for a garage ...more
By peoplefirst (787), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 12:12 PM
2 members liked this comment
From the article
"Westhampton Beach Mayor Conrad Teller announced that he had caught wind of a possible application for a larger eruv than the one originally proposed two years ago by the Hampton Synagogue in Westhampton Beach."
===
Once it becomes a town issue, town citizens have a right to voice their concerns. Once again, we are talking about a precedent. I don't care if it is a black band around a pole or a 20 foot flag, the precedent is set allowing special considerations for other ...more
By double standard (1506), quogue on Oct 1, 10 12:24 PM
1 member liked this comment
Can those with knowledge help out the less informed (me) and explain how someone owns and/or has a financial stake in a Synogogue?

Lets say 100 Orthodox move into the area and each donate money to the Synogogue. This is bad because?

If 100 Catholics moved into the area and donated money that a Priest was caught putting in his pocket, would everyone argue we should ban Christmas. Seems like the sticky fingered Priest is the issue, not his parishioners.

Unless this ...more
By CommonSense (71), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 12:51 PM
2 members liked this comment
Just for the record, priests do not have a vow of poverty. Jesuits do, but not your typical parish priest.
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 2, 10 8:47 PM
Why should a religion, any religion for that matter be able to put signage on utility poles when signs are not allowed for other purposes?
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 1, 10 2:24 PM
You think a one inch in diameter black dot is a A SIGN???....wow!
Do you think ANYONE will ever notice it?
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 7:12 PM
Yes, and one that is one inch too big.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 12:43 AM
You ought to know.
By fcmcmann (417), Hampton Bays on Oct 2, 10 10:27 AM
Know what? That you are incapable of basing any of you blather on facts.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 4:09 PM
Well, like I said, it would seem even religion must evolve, to accomodate a changing society.

Or, must it?
By Mr. Z (11665), North Sea on Oct 1, 10 3:32 PM
To peoplefirst:

Thank you for opening the thread to discussion of the STPD. When the non-coms on the police department run the Town Council and the local paper not only does NO investigatory reporting on STPD corruption but refuses to allow comment on so-called "police" matters on its website, its hard to find a forum for pointing out the emperor's nakedness (unless one chooses to stick up one's head and shout ,"gobble-gobble",to the ruling imperial turkey shooters).

Nonetheless, ...more
By highhatsize (4177), East Quogue on Oct 1, 10 6:20 PM
Why don't they just put one on the Montauk Lighthouse and one in San Diego. Then you can do whatever you want in the whole country!!
By orpiment (3), Hampton Bays on Oct 1, 10 7:28 PM
I think the idea of an Eruv as well as MOST rules and evasions of rules that are part of the three major religions of 5000, 3000, 2000, and 1400 years ago are all pretty obsolete in the 21st century. All are speculative interpretations of bibles and korans that bear no relation to what was supposedly said and written those millenia ago. That there are intelligent people who are irrational and illogical who want to preserve these traditions is indisputable. Where it has NO effect on the rest of us ...more
By DasK (26), on Oct 1, 10 7:33 PM
1 member liked this comment
All that makes sense. I just ask why the boundaries could not be mapped out, even with GPS coordinates for those who chose or need to remain within the Eruv. All without the need for signs anywhere, any government or residents approval? This would cause no controversy, which leads me to wonder if controversy is not the main intention of this undertaking.
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 2, 10 4:18 PM
Yard Sale Signs........ Let the horders and old people out!
By bobba (39), southampton on Oct 1, 10 8:34 PM
oh let 'em have their little things and symbol and area. who really cares. look at polish town, its quaint.
By justduckey (58), artist colony on Oct 2, 10 8:20 AM
I've started a new religion and I'd like you all to join.

Rather than string wires like silly string art I'll just use an existing area roadmap. Heck that's too hard...so let's say anyone in exchange 288 can join...no wait area code 631! My religion is simple: please and thank you predominate most requests/acknowledgments. Everyone should be kind, happy and drive safely. Enjoy a morning coffee. Take a bike ride. For initiations we'll go in the ocean when the waves are up. Oh and ...more
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 2, 10 9:00 PM
Grilling thee lamb will limit thy followers. Chasing frosty beer with Sauvignon blanc is a blasphemous act in MY coincidentally recently-formed religion. Thou wouldst suffer eternity in Hangover Hell
By loading... (588), quiogue on Oct 3, 10 4:15 AM
But is it kind and good natured to exclude people from other area codes in your religion. Also, people who like grilled lamb who want to move to Long Island may feel your neighborhood (631) is the only one they should consider living in. It isn't the lamb, it's the geographic restrictions that are disturbing about your religion.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 11:35 AM
Also, I think that because so many lamb eaters are only moving to your neighborhood, the vegetarian families who have been living there for many years may start to feel very uncomfortable when all of your followers start grilling lamb all around them.
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 11:58 AM
In reply to your invitation, thank you but even though I like most aspects of your religion, I have good friends who are vegetarians and some others who live outside (631) who I believe may be hurt and offended if I join. Thanks for the invite though!
By METCOMedia (116), Hampton Bays on Oct 3, 10 12:27 PM
I like the notion of recently reformed! There is always room for improvement. Of course, I might just amend it back.

As for the lovers of veggies and any other particulars that all works well for me. My overall point is just do what is enjoyable and non-intrusive to all.

As for the 631 limitation it was spoof on imaginary boundaries...but you knew that
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 3, 10 9:03 PM
please! as you all sleep the indians are coming!
By bobba (39), southampton on Oct 3, 10 7:43 PM
The Cleveland Indians?
By ICE (1214), Southampton on Oct 3, 10 8:57 PM
H1b visa holders?
By loading... (588), quiogue on Oct 4, 10 4:07 AM
Underground utilities would resolve this problem.
By EastEnd68 (888), Westhampton on Oct 4, 10 10:22 AM
Hmm! God must be very proud of his subjects.
By Scratch (26), Sag Harbor on Oct 4, 10 6:11 PM
1 member liked this comment
Aren't there still shops closed on Sundays for religious observances? Really, what is the big deal if the Eruv exists and doesn't affect you?? I don't get this intolerance from so many on this board.I think it's being way too over analyzied. We say we're a country that is tolerant of all peoples, races and creeds. Doesn't the Statue of Liberty mean anything? . The United States is a place where people came to get away from religious persecution. Yes, there is also the separation of church and ...more
By Infoseeker (279), Hampton Bays on Oct 5, 10 11:10 AM
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By my reckoning the SoL has nothing to do with an Eruv or religious freedom. It was a gift from France with kitschy poem by Emma Lazarus ""Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


No mention of religion at all.
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 7, 10 1:48 PM
OK here's the rub that everyone seems to be missing:

The first attempt at the eruv failed.The basic point ai gleaned from the Youtube videos was that it would allow orthodox jews to attend services on the Sabbath and do some basic tasks (stroller etc). I sense it was met with such hostility, moreso b/c of the Rabbi and his ways and means, rather than the eruv itself.

That being said this second effort is a pretty large eruv. What is very clear is that the first premise (getting ...more
By Hambone (513), New York on Oct 14, 10 9:10 AM
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