'A Divine Conversation' At Christ Episcopal Church - 27 East

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‘A Divine Conversation’ At Christ Episcopal Church

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“Jib Net” by Lisa Hein and Bob Seng, installed inside Christ Episcopal Church.

“Jib Net” by Lisa Hein and Bob Seng, installed inside Christ Episcopal Church.

Teri Hackett and Reverend Karen Campbell at the opening of “Divine Intervention” at Christ Episcopal Church on Saturday, June 1.

Teri Hackett and Reverend Karen Campbell at the opening of “Divine Intervention” at Christ Episcopal Church on Saturday, June 1.

authorStaff Writer on Aug 2, 2019

This summer, “Divine Intervention,” an art exhibition curated by artist Teri Hackett, has turned Sag Harbor’s Christ Episcopal Church into a veritable gallery. This first contemporary art project for the church has brought together 34 artists from the East End and New York City in a blend of installations, paintings, photography, sculpture and artist’s books.

On Thursday, August 15, at 6 p.m., the church hosts “Divine Conversation,” a free, unscripted, panel discussion with Ms. Hackett, Reverend Karen Ann Campbell (rector of Christ Episcopal Church), and artists Lisa Hein, Bob Seng, April Gornik and John Torreano.

With this show, there’s plenty to talk about.

Ms. Hein and Mr. Seng’s site-specific “Jib Net” is a tour de force installation that bisects the nave of the church, creating a webbed sail that transforms the interior into a sailing vessel. The church’s vestibule and bell tower, both of which have great historical significance, are addressed by artists Bastienne Schmidt and Almond Zigmund, whose use of vinyl, threads and fabrics, color and pattern creates a metaphorical point of entry.

Inside the sanctuary space, the historic 1917 Tiffany window is flanked by works of Drew Shiflett, Carole Seborovski and April Gornik. Paintings by Reynold Ruffins, Maureen McQuillan and Karen Arm complement the reflective light projected by smaller stained glass windows.

Other works of art have been placed throughout the sanctuary and can be found among the altar, corners, niches, arches and pews. Additional artists include Amanda Church, Leah Guadagnoli, Leo Holder, Dennis Hollingsworth, Erica-Lynn Huberty, Christa Maiwald, Ray Manikowski, Diane Mayo, Nell Painter, Marilla Palmer, Liza Phillips, Bonnie Rychlak, Anne Seelbach, Alison Slon, and Michelle Weinberg. Also on view are artists books by Angela Britzman, Barbara Friedman, Elisabeth Condon, Janet Goleas, Stephen White and Jodi Panas.

Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be used to create the Community Café at the church, a place for those in the Sag Harbor area who are lonely or hungry.

“Our desire is to hold a free dinner, served with dignity, restaurant style, once a week for the community,” said Rev. Campbell.

“Divine Intervention,” is on view through September 2. Viewing hours are Saturdays from 3 to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. or by appointment. Call (631) 725-0128 to schedule a viewing.

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