Editorials Archives - 27 East

Opinion

Sag Harbor Express / Opinion / Editorials

A Delicate Balance

A story from East Hampton Village last week highlighted an issue that could well be percolating beneath the service in many communities, as local volunteer ambulance corps seek a delicate balance of morale and necessary moves to provide reliable emergency care. A member of the...

Road Rules

Electronic bicycles, or e-bikes, seem to be everywhere all of a sudden. The bikes, with electric motors that can propel them at speeds up to 30 mph, have taken off, so to speak, this summer on the East End, with adults hoping to avoid the...

Brown Is Beautiful

At least for the moment, we’re not going to run out of water in the aquifers below our feet: According to the Suffolk County Water Authority, there is an estimated 65 trillion to 120 trillion gallons of water in Long Island’s natural underground reservoirs. In...

From Small Beginnings

Often, great things come from modest beginnings. What started out 20 years ago as a small advisory board to the East Hampton Town Board blossomed over the decades to become the preeminent voice for the East End’s Latino community. The Organización Latino Americana, or OLA,...

Expanding Deserts

There are, of course, so many things to be concerned about these days — a pair of viruses, war in Ukraine, an uneven U.S. economy, democracy under threat, climate change — but a steadily burning brush fire is quietly wiping out community journalism, and attention...

A Safe Place

In early July, it was revealed that the after-school enrichment program Project MOST, an East Hampton-based nonprofit that primarily serves students from the Springs and East Hampton school districts, is about to grow. It will not only take ownership of its longtime home at the...

Play It Safe

Sharks have been all over the news lately, and for good reason: “Shark Bites Human” stories grab attention, and the headlines make for good summer fodder on the evening news. But let’s stop to reflect and remember that sharks aren’t out to get us. In...

Bountiful Harvest

The rural nature of life on the South Fork is under siege, and has been for a long time, but there is one place where you can still see the benefit of living atop some of the best agricultural soils on the planet: in local...

Talk Is Cheap

Residents, lawmakers, business owners and the leaders of a multitude of nonprofits on the South Fork have been talking for years about ways to solve the housing crisis. While it’s been on the forefront of everyone’s minds and agendas, sadly, it seems, very little has...

Leave It Alone

Like the proverbial tree falling in a forest and the question of whether it makes a sound if nothing is around to hear it, a philosophical question arises regarding the Long Pond Greenbelt: Is a hearing still a hearing if nobody is listening? PSEG Long...

Gold Stars And Dunce Caps

DUNCE CAP: To Sag Harbor Mayor Jim Larocca, for reshuffling the regulatory boards in the village — and leaving out two key voices in the mix. Larocca may have had the best intentions, ensuring that board seat vacancies are staggered and bringing some veterans, like...

Pay Attention

South Fork communities have a tendency toward parochialism, worrying mostly about matters within their own borders, but this is a moment for every town and village official, and even every hamlet resident, to pay close attention to a proposal in Sag Harbor Village. It should...

The Way Back

The overturning of Roe v. Wade, which has established federal protection of basic abortion rights for women for a half century, was no less a bombshell even though everyone saw it coming. For anti-abortion activists, it’s a moment many of them prayed and protested for,...

Freedom Has Arrived

On June 19, 1865, federal troops arrived in the port city of Galveston, Texas, to share news of the Emancipation Proclamation, announcing that all enslaved people were free. While the news was welcomed by many, it arrived a bit late — a full two and...

Give It A Chance

Within moments of the news breaking that a developer had filed plans with the Village of Sag Harbor for a 79-unit affordable housing development, with retail on the ground floor, spread over a cluster of residential and commercial properties behind Main Street, social media was...

Less Than Nothing

Making progress is better than getting nothing done, and it’s important to keep that in mind, but the conclusion is inescapable: Our lawmakers’ response to gun violence — massacres — is woefully inadequate. The National Rifle Association learned after the 1999 Columbine High School shooting...

For the East Hampton Village Board

The election of two out of five trustee seats in East Hampton Village does not carry with it the power to overturn the majority, which is led by Mayor Jerry Larsen, but is important nonetheless as village government continues to evolve under the current leadership,...

For North Haven Mayor

Elections bring surprises, and perhaps this season’s biggest shocker was that the most hotly contested race among the South Fork’s villages would be in tiny North Haven Village, with fewer than 900 residents and less than 3 square miles. Mayor Jeff Sander decided not to...

Under The Big Top, There’s Room For All

Back to the drawing board is probably not a bad move for Guild Hall. After unveiling ambitious renovation plans for the 91-year-old arts and cultural institution in February, Guild Hall’s administration and board chair recently announced they would take a step back from a portion...

Land, Air And Water

Sag Harbor Village has found itself at a literal crossroads — in three dimensions. As Blade, and other seaplane services, eye the village as an alternative to East Hampton Airport should the town succeed in restricting helicopter flights from Manhattan, and with the Hampton Jitney...

Bringing Them Home

The Shinnecock Graves Protection Warrior Society has made tremendous strides in the past few years in protecting ancient burial sites in Shinnecock Hills and repatriating the remains of Shinnecock ancestors from museums, universities and the private collections of archaeologists. But the group’s work is far...

In Our Corner

Just as proving a negative is a philosophical challenge, it’s very hard to say what the world would be like had a key player never made an entrance. George Bailey got a taste of it in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” thanks to angels, but the...

A Cry For Action

In the face of another senseless, tragic act of gun violence in America, we’ll share the only words that truly matter, the words that speak volumes and cry for action. Nevaeh Bravo, 10 Jackie Cazares, 10 Makenna Lee Elrod, 10 Jose Flores Jr., 10 Eliahna...

Activist Judges

It’s almost quaint to remember, a decade ago, the standing complaint within the Republican Party that the Democrats were relying too much on “judicial activism” to enact policy. Complaints about so-called activist judges became part of the standard rhetoric, and it continues to this day:...

A Team Of Heroes

This week, May 15 to 21, is National Emergency Medical Services Week, and this year’s theme is “EMS: Rising to the Challenge.” It’s a moment to recognize the selfless contributions of so many men and women in our community, and to offer some well-earned thanks...

Lift The Limit

One of the biggest hang-ups homeowners have with the existing affordable accessory apartments law in Southampton Town is that only live-in homeowners can qualify for an accessory apartment. This disqualifies many homeowners — and explains why the program is so underused. As both Southampton and...

Time To Talk

It won’t be on the ballot next week, as the various school districts on the South Fork seek approval for 2022-23 budgets and to fill school board seats. Nevertheless, those budgets all speak volumes about the issue. School consolidation. It’s time — long past time,...

A Team Effort

Newspaper conventions are not for readers, by design, but they can do wonders for news organizations. Over the weekend, the New York Press Association, the nation’s largest such organization, representing more than 800 newspapers published in the state, held its annual gathering in person for...

A Hamlet In Crisis

There is a map included in the draft version of East Hampton Town’s recently unveiled Coastal Assessment and Resiliency Plan that should be placed on a banner and towed behind a plane flying over the South Fork’s beaches this summer — it’s that important. It...

A Lasting Legacy

A search of the archives of The Southampton Press doesn’t turn up many results for Rose Walton, a former Remsenburg resident and an LGBTQ pioneer who died earlier this month at her home in Sunset Beach, Florida, with her wife, Marjorie Sherwin, and niece Robin...

Sharing The Cost

An obstacle facing officials in the five East End towns as they begin a campaign to encourage support for a new Community Housing Fund, which would use a transfer tax to pay for affordable housing measures, is the perception that towns will try to simply...

The Human Toll

As Southampton and East Hampton towns, and Sag Harbor Village, embark on efforts to finally address the growing affordable housing crisis, it’s important to take note of the story of Steve Thorsen, told at a recent Express Sessions discussion of the topic in East Hampton,...

Ahead On Points

There are times when success can be harder to observe than failure. Think of your car. When something is wrong, alarm bells go off, sometimes literally, and there is plenty of drama to let you know there’s a problem, whether it’s billows of smoke or...

Routing The Future

A pilot program being run by Suffolk County Transit that provides on-demand bus service shows a promising future for the county bus system on the East End. It’s an innovative approach to meet the needs of area residents by recognizing that the eastern half of...

Pick Up The Phone

Two years ago, the world came to a literal and screeching halt with the arrival of COVID-19. In spring 2020, businesses and organizations both large and small shut down as people around the world rethought their strategies, adjusting to remote and online methods of working....

Heed The Warning

Climate change is devastating, and its worst impacts are looming, as this newspaper’s “Rising Tide” series of articles in the Residence section is dutifully documenting. But it’s not the only crisis on the horizon: There’s another, and, similarly, we’re creating it ourselves. Over the decades,...

A Park For Everyone

Last month, plans were unveiled for much needed improvements at Mashashimuet Park in Sag Harbor. Designed by landscape architect Ed Hollander and drafted by the school district’s architectural firm, H2M, the plans recently were unveiled at a meeting of the Sag Harbor School Board after...

Pros And Cons

Rumor became news last week when it was announced that the Town of Southampton has made an offer to buy a commercial building at 2 Main Street in Sag Harbor, using its Community Preservation Fund. The building, known locally as “Fort Apache,” is seen by...

Editorial: For State Assembly

Yet again this year, a “straw woman” candidate is on the Republican line on Tuesday’s ballot for the seat in the State Assembly from the 1st District, which includes the South Fork — there’s been no active campaign, no serious effort to mount a challenge....

Editorial: The Propositions

There are two questions on the November 3 ballot from Suffolk County. Our position is that “no” is the proper way to mark the ballot in both instances. Proposition 1 would change the term of office for Suffolk County legislators from two to four years,...

Editorial: For Congress

Nancy Goroff is our enthusiastic choice for the 1st District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Democratic newcomer is not just an acceptable alternative to the incumbent, Republican Lee Zeldin, she is, in nearly every way, the better choice to represent the region...

Editorial: For State Senate

For the first time since 1977, the 1st District will not be represented in the State Senate by Kenneth LaValle, who is retiring after a legendary career. That puts a lot of pressure on his successor, and on the voters who have to choose him...

EDITORIAL: For North Haven Village

A majority of the seats up for election in North Haven Village are uncontested. Much like Sag Harbor Village, where Trustees Jim Larocca and Thomas Gardella are running unopposed to retain their seats on the Village Board, in North Haven longtime Mayor Jeff Sander is...

Editorial: Make It Work

It’s a scary time. It’s even scarier for members of the workforce — currently employed or not. The pandemic has robbed scores of people on the East End of their jobs, leaving them scrambling to figure out how to pay for housing, utilities, transportation and...

Editorial: A Foundation Of Respect

At a time full of strife and conflict, it’s nice to look around in the near distance and see comforting signs that disagreement doesn’t necessarily require disrespect. Conversations are taking place all over America on the need for police reform. It’s a discussion that’s also...

Editorial: Finding A Balance

In abnormal times, it’s understandable to long for the normal. But it’s probably more sensible to recognize the immediate challenges and accept that they will take you into uncharted waters. Every school district — and, as we all know, there are a lot of them...

Editorial: Statues And Lives

There have been numerous Black Lives Matter protests held in Suffolk County in the wake of the death of George Floyd at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis in May. Here in the five towns of the East End, there have been nearly a...

Editorial: A Time To Remember

There is no sugar-coating it: The Class of 2020 got ripped off. There was no prom, no senior skip day, none of the anticipation and celebration of a traditional graduation ceremony. But something splendid happened. In every school district, teachers, administrators and support staff came...

Editorial: An Uncertain Autumn

Over the course of the last week, families with children in prekindergarten, kindergarten, fifth, eighth and 12th grades all celebrated graduation, and students began preparing to embark on new journeys that remain largely out of focus, as most colleges and local school districts are not...

Editorial: Just A Face In The Crowd

For U.S. Representative Lee Zeldin, it had to be a big night: President Donald Trump invited him to Tulsa, Oklahoma, for the first big political rally of his reelection campaign to be held after the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Mr. Zeldin had the rare...

Editorial: Show Must Go On

The fluid nature of the state’s response to the COVID-19 epidemic and, in particular, to school districts being allowed to host graduation ceremonies for departing seniors has left many district officials reeling this week, as they try to determine whether they can change course quickly...

Editorial: A Shout In The Street

With elegant understatement, The Washington Post headlined its Monday afternoon email update: “This moment is not normal.” That truly does sum up the current state of the union: abnormal. On this — and perhaps only this — we all can agree. A confluence of crises...

Editorial: Second-Guessing Steinbeck Park

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen,” said celebrated author John Steinbeck — and it appears that the committee advising Sag Harbor Village on the future of its newest waterfront park...

Editorial: Who We Are

The Reverend Karen Campbell of Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is the latest East End resident to return from the southern border with eyewitness testimony of what’s happening there, despite the politically charged rhetoric that has made conversations about immigration so difficult. But they...

Editorial: An American Success Story

As Black History Month comes to a close, February delivered a devastating blow with the death of B. Smith, whose pioneering role as an African American entrepreneur cannot be overstated. Barbara Elaine Smith’s business empire came from modest roots, fed by a passion and commitment,...

Editorial: A Teachable Moment

Race remains a third rail topic in America, and Black History Month in February presents an opportunity to stride forward purposefully, or to misstep. Sometimes the line between the two isn’t very wide. Witness an exchange between two prominent local historians: Dr. Georgette L. Grier-Key, who...

Editorial: The Start of Something

Last week’s Press Sessions discussion focusing on the East Hampton Airport and its future was a start of a conversation that needs to dig much, much deeper. The fact that the debate wasn’t altogether acrimonious was a good start. The fact that it was a...

Editorial: Slow Down, You Move Too Fast

It was a quick shift — the moment when smartphones went from a device most commonly found in the hands of working adults, to one that some children expect to receive while still in elementary school. The impact of early access to smartphone technology and...

Editorial: Equal for All

There has been much clamoring recently about changes enacted last month to the state’s criminal justice system, most notably the elimination of cash bail for many defendants changed with nonviolent offenses. Those opposed to the reforms are quick to point to high-profile cases — Montauk...

Editorial: Oversight Long Overdue

It would be almost farcical if it was not so serious, but the latest news out of the saga that has become the reconstruction of the former Stella Maris Regional School building into the Sag Harbor Learning Center proves once more that it is incumbent...

Editorial: Celebrating Our History

As Sag Harbor Village continues to be a regional epicenter for redevelopment, perhaps now, more than ever, understanding the history of the village — a history that has defined its architectural aesthetic and helped preserve its quaint Main Street, as well as the traditions that...

Editorial: At Our Doorstep

It wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to consider marine animal strandings, like that of a minke whale at Northwest Creek on November 21, as a form of communication. After all, whales and dolphins speak to one another in their own respective languages, and...

Editorial: A Safer Stretch

In October 2015, when 81-year-old Anna Pump of Sag Harbor, a well-known chef and cookbook author who co-owned the Loaves & Fishes Foodstore in Bridgehampton, was run down by a car in a crosswalk not far from the shop, it was a tragic wakeup call...

Editorial: Giving Thanks

It’s lovely that Americans set aside a holiday each fall for the simple purpose of taking time to reflect on the things we are thankful for. In this space, we often take the time to appreciate the abundance surrounding us on the South Fork —...

A Welcome Retreat

Organized religion has faced an uphill battle over the last two decades: As the United States has become an increasingly secular society, many houses of worship nationwide ultimately shuttered their doors in the face of dwindling numbers of congregants. As it likes to do, Sag...

A Coach’s Legacy

Carl Johnson is Bridgehampton basketball. It’s a bold statement, considering the school’s long, storied history, which includes nine state championships, second-most in New York history — all the more remarkable, considering the school’s tiny enrollment. But no single man has embodied that history in the...

Editorial: The Sum of Its Parts

There has been a lot of talk over the course of the last five years about how Sag Harbor Village has changed. And it has — from its demographics to some of the shops and restaurants that line its Rockwellian Main Street, and certainly the...

We Mark Our Ballot in Southampton

There’s an irony in the fact that the Southampton Town Board of Trustees used to pride itself in being “above politics,” something it stressed every campaign season. (It was a time, it must be said, when the Republican Party reliably held every board seat, which...

For East Hampton Supervisor And Town Council

This has been an odd and, sadly, uneven race for East Hampton Town supervisor and the two council seats now held by Peter Van Scoyoc, Sylvia Overby and David Lys, three Democrats on an entirely Democratic Town Board. For several reasons, there will be not...

Editorial: Come Together

For the first time in recent history, the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees will host a work session on a Saturday morning in its continued effort to reach as wide an audience of village residents and taxpayers as possible. Frankly, it is about time...

Editorial: In This Together

There is probably no subject talked about more on the East End — or one as divisive — as affordable housing. We all know the familiar refrain: Young people are moving south because they can’t afford to live here; the workforce moves further and further...

Editorial: It Takes a Village

After most busy summer seasons where Sag Harbor feels more like Times Square than a sleepy, historic whaling village, it’s always the week after Labor Day, on HarborFest, when locals come out to remember exactly why they live here year-round in the first place. While...

Editorial: Gold Stars and Dunce Caps

Gold Star - To Bridgehampton School officials, for letting the Bees buzz one last time in their hive. Look, it’s understandable that there was some concern about fielding a varsity basketball team made up largely of young, inexperienced players who just barely fill out a...

Editorial: Rally for Steinbeck Park

Hats off to former Mayor Sandra Schroeder and Trustee Jim Larocca for their efforts over at least four years to secure for the Village of Sag Harbor an open parcel of downtown waterfront land set to open next week as a public park. The preservation...

Turning Point

Even in the numbing parade of seemingly daily outrages since November 8, 2016, there is the occasional outlier—something so spectacularly outrageous, so mortifying, that it still has the capacity to stun. Charlottesville was one. The event was bad enough, but President Donald Trump’s remarks afterward,...

Clean Water At Any Price

The state has acted responsibly in adopting tougher new limits, set by the Drinking Water Quality Council, for PFOS and PFOA, chemical compounds identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as “emerging contaminants.” Linked to a number of serious health effects, PFOA and PFOS have been...

Editorial: Gold Stars and Dunce Caps

To members of the clergy in Sag Harbor Village who continue to be particularly active in social justice causes, working across denominations as a community to offer a network of support for any group of people being marginalized—this month evidenced at gatherings in the village,...

Editorial: At A Loss

It is impossible to fathom the pain surrounding the recent deaths of the 2-year-old twin girls, apparently at their own mother’s hand, on the terrible journey that ended in Montauk. To people in this area, the girls and their mother, who lived in Medford, were...

Editorial: A New Normal?

It’s a time when “normal” is in flux in so many ways. The old adage about the frog in the pot of water hardly noticing that the water is getting closer and closer to boiling — it’s never been more relevant. Among the many examples...

Editorial: Much Work To Do

It’s sitting on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s desk, just waiting to change life on the South Fork for the better. Legislation approved in June in Albany would create the Community Housing Fund, patterned on the unconditional success of the Community Preservation Fund. The CPF was created...

Editorial: Sensible — And Humane — Legislation

When the New York State Legislature and Governor Andrew Cuomo ushered through a law this week that allows undocumented immigrants the ability to apply for driver’s licenses in New York State, they did so with the understanding that this is not only an economic benefit...

Editorial: A Village Has Spoken

The high turnout and the strikingly large margin of victory for mayor-elect Kathleen Mulcahy and two allied trustee candidates in Tuesday’s Sag Harbor Village election suggest that concern about village government has been running deep across all sectors of the electorate. Although “us-versus-them” is unfortunately...

Editorial: For Trustees

While there are four candidates on the ballot for a pair of two-year terms on the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees, only three are really running in this race. Silas Marder did not participate in the only candidate forum and has not returned multiple...

Editorial: For Mayor

It is impossible for local government leaders to please everyone and they should certainly not try. There always will be divergent and varied opinions on most issues and, in Sag Harbor — perhaps the least apathetic of South Fork communities — that is almost always...

Editorial: Support Our Ambulance Corps

Voters in Sag Harbor will also be asked next Tuesday to weigh in on a proposition that would allow the village to raise the “length of service award program” (LOSAP) benefit for members of the Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps from $20 to $30 a...

Editorial: The Healthiest Choice

The Sag Harbor School Board of Education deserves credit for working with its transportation committee to come up with a reasonable way to cut down on transportation costs while also preserving the later start time at Pierson Middle-High School. Instituting the 15-minute later start time...

Editorial: Opening Lines of Communication

As the candidates running in Sag Harbor Village for mayor and the board of trustees talk about the need for better communications with the public, there are good examples all around us of public entities that do a pretty good job at it. One is...

Editorial: Let There Be Light

The Sag Harbor Cinema fire of December 16, 2016 left a deep wound in a village where generations of locals, summer people and visitors had fond memories of its old-fashioned décor, its rare single screen, its funky candy counter and its earthy smell, the result...

Editorial: More Than Just a Holiday

In resort communities like those found on the East End of Long Island, Memorial Day weekend is often a time for celebration. It is the beginning of warmer weather, with weekends on the beach no longer a fantasy but a reality soon to be enjoyed...

Editorial: Practical Realities

We do not reject the ideals laid out in the Declaration of Independence because Congress excised Jefferson’s condemnation of the slave trade. We do not throw out the Constitution because it tells the states to count each of their slaves as three-fifths of a person....

Editorial: For Sag Harbor School Board

Two years ago, this newspaper titled its endorsement editorial “A District Divided” in advance of the Sag Harbor School District Board of Education election and budget vote. When it comes to certain issues — and clashes in personality — it remains a district with divergent...

Editorial: Curious Proposal

Town of Southampton made the effort to reassess all its taxable properties 30 years ago to eliminate inequities caused by years of neglect and unfair assessing practices. The town protects the accuracy of the rolls by updating its figures every year, at full value, something...

Editorial: A House Deserving of Worship

There may be no other structure more unique and iconic to Sag Harbor Village than the Old Whalers’ (First Presbyterian) Church on Union Street, which on Sunday, at 11 a.m., will hold a special service celebrating the 175th anniversary of its dedication. The looming Egyptian...

Editorial: An Issue of Safety

Legislation is pending in Albany that would restore the ability for everyone, including undocumented immigrants, to obtain a standard driver’s license after passing comprehensive driver’s exams to ensure safety on our roadways. There are few — on either side of the immigration debate — that...

Editorial: ‘They Are Us

When it comes to complicated environmental issues, chatter from the masses often sounds something like “They need to do this…” or “They should be doing that…” But whether it’s replacing an aging septic system or reverting back to native landscapes, the ultimate path to saving...

Editorial: Contests are Best

This week, school board elections shaped up in Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor with a strong showing of candidates in both school districts, which will enjoy contested races on May 21. And that is a good thing. Contested races, whether for school board, town board or...

Editorial: Full Charge Ahead

The East Hampton Town Board is considering a second proposal by the Tesla company to install an electric vehicle charging station — at no cost to taxpayers — in a public parking lot in downtown Montauk. The proposal, less than a year since Tesla pitched...

Editorial: Many Hands

While blessed with a beautiful waterfront, the residents of Sag Harbor do not enjoy the same abundant amount of green space. So, we make do with what we have, which includes Mashashimuet Park, the largest area for recreational activity in the Sag Harbor area. The...

Editorial: It All Goes Back to Housing

Amagansett could be home to a new 37-unit affordable housing complex off Montauk Highway as soon as this fall, Catherine Casey, the executive director of the East Hampton Housing Authority, reported to the East Hampton Town Board on April 2 while requesting to stage the...

Editorial: Planning for the Park

The Sag Harbor Village Harbor Committee on Monday signed off on plans for Jay Bialsky’s West Water Street townhouse project, which is now waiting on approvals from New York State and the Army Corps of Engineers before construction will begin on what could be one...

Editorial: Sobering Statistics

While we all like to celebrate success, it’s important to also recognize that many children are struggling to cope with the challenges before them while avoiding high-risk, unhealthy and potentially fatal choices. East End school districts, for the most part, have embraced educating parents and...

Editorial: The Right Kind of Balance

Pressure on high school students today is greater than it was in past generations. Partially because of the internet and social media, but also because of higher expectations — for better and worse — that parents and society lay at the feet of children, juggling...

Editorial: No Longer an Afterthought

When Southampton resident Sara Topping joined a group of East End women in founding the East End Birth Network, it was a nonprofit founded with urgency and a realization that this is home to communities with some of the highest infant mortality rates in New...

Editorial: More Details, More Time

It may seem that everyone on the South Fork has oodles of money amid rising assessments on property values. But for those who have been here for 10, 20 or 30 years, some with families that have lived here for generations, the reality is clear:...

Editorial: Shared Services in Bridgehampton

Parents and even one member of its own board of education were understandably frustrated at a budget forum at the Bridgehampton School earlier this month when it was announced the district has proposed money to support the hiring of additional administrators, while parents report a...

Editorial: South Fork Connection

Even though turnout was low and there were a few small glitches for some riders when the South Fork Commuter Connection launched on March 4, it’s way too early to brand it a train to nowhere. Our bet is it will show the way to...

Editorial: Lawyerly Advice

Recent developments have supported Councilman Jeff Bragman’s argument that the Town of East Hampton should be doing nothing to assist, support or even cooperate with the developer of the South Fork Wind Farm while it is awaiting the completion of a review of the project’s...

A Letter from the Publishers: ‘Express Pass’ Membership and Subscription Changes

To Our Readers, Since its founding in 1859, The Sag Harbor Express has seen the Village of Sag Harbor through a series of changing times. Launched as the whaling industry was approaching its sunset, The Express was not the first newspaper in Sag Harbor. That...

Editorial: The Main Street Takeaway

Sag Harbor is not a village that can be narrowly defined. Just as it can no longer be referred to as an industrial or blue-collar community, it is not solely a high-end or luxury resort destination either. Much has changed in Sag Harbor, a diverse...

Editorial: Speak Up, SANS

Residents of the Sag Harbor Hills, Azurest and Ninevah subdivisions (SANS) have been working for three years to earn their neighborhoods landmark status on the New York State Register of Historic Places. A decision from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic...

Editorial: Saving the Bays

The Sag Harbor Village Board delayed a vote last week on its proposal to require innovative-alternative or “I/A” on-site septic systems that actively reduce nitrogen discharge for all new residential construction. The proposal also would require an I/A system whenever existing conventional septic systems must...

Editorial: Election Reform

What a difference an election makes. The anti-Trump Democratic tide that rattled Republicans all over the country in November and returned the House of Representatives to Democratic control also wrestled the New York State Assembly from Republican dominance. What has that meant? For one thing,...

Editorial: Take Your Time

It appears the Sag Harbor Board of Historic Preservation and Architectural Review may be poised to take a formal vote on the largest development application before all the village boards — developer Jay Bialsky’s plans to redevelop 2 West Water Street, currently a behemoth, white...

Editorial: Slow Down

The 24-hour news cycle, especially in the age of Donald Trump, is truly insatiable. It’s in this kind of environment that news outlets and opinion-makers can jump to conclusions. In the race to make a splash on social media, reporters, editors, columnists and bloggers are...

Editorial: Let’s Talk

For most small communities, the digital age has not provided the sort of face-to-face, constructive and civil debate that drives true innovation and accomplishment. Nuances get lost online and opinions and facts have a greater potential to blur together, with real and potentially destructive consequences...

Editorial: Of Critical Importance

When Trustee Aiden Corish reported at the Sag Harbor Village Board meeting on January 8 that the state had rejected the village’s application for a consolidated grant of $2.5 million to help fund the renovation of Long Wharf, it was one little detail at a...

Editorial: A Flawed Process

When the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees adopted a new policy earlier this year limiting public comment to the end of its monthly meeting — after board members have already decided on and voted on every single resolution — it was clear it was...

Editorial: Staying the Course

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander has been a boon to Sag Harbor, helping property owners find ways to enjoy beautiful grounds while using new technologies and native plants and trees to create wetland boundaries that prevent runoff and eliminate the need for herbicides and fertilizers. The...

Editorial: Facing Yard-Waste Reality

An explosion in residential landscaping in recent years, and a decline in the number of businesses accepting wood, brush and leaf material for disposal, has left the Town of Southampton handling a burgeoning volume of yard waste. At the town’s Hampton Bays disposal facility, it’s...

Most Read

1
Sharing The Cost
2
A Team Of Heroes
3
The Way Back
4
Freedom Has Arrived
5
A Hamlet In Crisis
Show More

Opinion Columnist

https://www.27east.com/wp-content/themes/27East/images/

Andrew Bowen

https://www.27east.com/wp-content/themes/27East/images/

Anne Surchin

https://www.27east.com/wp-content/themes/27East/images/

Jack Crimmins

https://www.27east.com/wp-content/themes/27East/images/

Lisa Wolf, MSW, LCSW