IRS Finally Waives Taxes on Septic Grants | 27Speaks Podcast

27Speaks: IRS Finally Waives Taxes on Septic Grants

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authorStaff Writer on Dec 8, 2022

Suffolk County’s Septic Improvement Program grants and similar grants issued by Southampton and East Hampton towns to subsidize nitrogen-reducing innovative/alternative septic systems will no longer be subject to federal income tax, a change that provides long-awaited relief to grant recipients and perhaps encouraging more participation in the future. The IRS announced the move this month in light of the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently determining that the grants should be exempt from income tax because they are primarily for the purpose of environmental protection. To discuss the history of the controversy and the implications of the outcome, senior reporter Michael Wright joins the editors on the podcast this week.

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