Community News, April 18 - 27 East

Community News, April 18

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The Hampton Bays Cub Scout Pack 483 hosted its annual Pinewood Derby on April 13 at the activity center in Squiretown Park.  The winners were Byce Smith, first; Rowan DiFalco second; and Noah Miranda, third. COURTESY PACK 483

The Hampton Bays Cub Scout Pack 483 hosted its annual Pinewood Derby on April 13 at the activity center in Squiretown Park. The winners were Byce Smith, first; Rowan DiFalco second; and Noah Miranda, third. COURTESY PACK 483

Hampton Bays High School ninth-grader Gimena Valdespino placed first in the Southampton Town Youth Bureau's Hamptons Got Talent  competition last weekend. COURTESY SOUTHAMPTON TOWN YOUTH BUREAU

Hampton Bays High School ninth-grader Gimena Valdespino placed first in the Southampton Town Youth Bureau's Hamptons Got Talent competition last weekend. COURTESY SOUTHAMPTON TOWN YOUTH BUREAU

Neil deGrasse Tyson at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City.           Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Neil deGrasse Tyson at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City. Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

April Gornik and Eric Fischl at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City.           Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

April Gornik and Eric Fischl at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City. Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Howard and Nancy Marks, Andrea Grover and Daryl Roth at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City. The event, recognizes the lifetime achievements of artists, creative professionals, and individuals who passionately support the arts, this year honored Broadway producer Daryl Roth with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Performing Arts, Nancy and Howard Marks were given the Special Award for Leadership and Philanthropy.              Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Howard and Nancy Marks, Andrea Grover and Daryl Roth at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City. The event, recognizes the lifetime achievements of artists, creative professionals, and individuals who passionately support the arts, this year honored Broadway producer Daryl Roth with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Performing Arts, Nancy and Howard Marks were given the Special Award for Leadership and Philanthropy. Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Bernadette Peters at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City.           Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Bernadette Peters at Guild Hall's 38th annual Academy of the Arts Achievement Awards Dinner on April 3, at the Rainbow Room in New York City. Sean Zanni for Patrick McMullan

Philip Tortorice, third from left, received the Lawrence Goldstein High Point Award at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on April 13.  With him are, from  left, Second Assistant Chief Virginia Massey, First Assistant Chief Steven Schaefer, and Chief John Dalen.  COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Philip Tortorice, third from left, received the Lawrence Goldstein High Point Award at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on April 13. With him are, from left, Second Assistant Chief Virginia Massey, First Assistant Chief Steven Schaefer, and Chief John Dalen. COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Joseph Dalen, Paul Massey, and Edward Schneyer, holding plaques, shared honors as the Firefighters of the Year at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on  April 13.    COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Joseph Dalen, Paul Massey, and Edward Schneyer, holding plaques, shared honors as the Firefighters of the Year at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on April 13. COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Lieutenant Henry Adelwerth, second from right, received a fifty years of service award at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on  April 13. With him are First Assistant Chief Steven Schaefer, Chief John Dalen, Suffolk County Executive Edward Romaine, and Second Assistant Chief Virginia Massey.   COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Lieutenant Henry Adelwerth, second from right, received a fifty years of service award at the Eastport Fire Department's 2024 Installation Dinner at Georgio’s in Calverton on April 13. With him are First Assistant Chief Steven Schaefer, Chief John Dalen, Suffolk County Executive Edward Romaine, and Second Assistant Chief Virginia Massey. COURTESY EASTPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Dark Skies Committee of Southampton Town hosted an event in the Southampton High School planetarium on Friday. April is

The Dark Skies Committee of Southampton Town hosted an event in the Southampton High School planetarium on Friday. April is "Dark Skies Month" in Southampton Town. DANA SHAW

authorStaff Writer on Apr 15, 2024
YOUTH CORNER Circle of Fun The East Hampton Library, 159 Main Street in East Hampton, will host its Circle of Fun class, for parents with toddlers up to 3 years... more

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