Community News, March 23 - 27 East

Community News, March 23

icon 4 Photos
Clint Greenbaum of Westhampton Beach recently surpassed riding 40,000 miles on the North and South fork on his ElliptiGo. So far, he's been out 2, 200 rides, averaging 18.19 mph.

Clint Greenbaum of Westhampton Beach recently surpassed riding 40,000 miles on the North and South fork on his ElliptiGo. So far, he's been out 2, 200 rides, averaging 18.19 mph.

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, above, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish.   RICHARD LEWIN

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, above, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish. RICHARD LEWIN

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish.   RICHARD LEWIN

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish. RICHARD LEWIN

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish.   RICHARD LEWIN

On Thursday evening, Amber Waves Farm of Amagansett hosted Rugelach baking workshop with baker and owner of Twisted Challah Bakery, Hope Kramer, featuring the farm's very own whole wheat flour. Attendees learned how to make the special holiday bakery favorite from start to finish. RICHARD LEWIN

authorStaff Writer on Mar 20, 2023
MONTAUK ‘Monologues’ Performance on Saturday Members of the Montauk Library’s Introduction to Stage Acting Class — Barbara Mattson, Loretta Davis, Abi Prince, Donald Newman, Diane Ferraro, Stan Wiencko, Christina Sun,... more

You May Also Like:

Naturally Starched

We got our first clothes dryer in 1985. My mother was on her way to Europe, and this was our crutch: We’d have an easier way to do laundry in her lengthy absence. She returned, the dryer stayed, though it is seldom used. I never developed an affinity for the appliance. Weather is less convenient than the appliance, and weather takes up more space, but line-dried laundry makes your outfit stiff and straight. Naturally starched by springtime. While most people think of me as mainly a farmer; I have been a consultant on laundry lines for years. Helping new homeowners ... 28 May 2024 by Marilee Foster

VIEWPOINT: ‘Skip the Stuff’ To Reduce Waste

The “Skip the Stuff” concept — and, in some places, already the law — is galvanizing communities all over the country who are looking for ways to reduce single-use plastic that litters our streets and waterways and chokes our landfills. The objective is to reduce the needless distribution of single-use plastic at food service establishments or via those who deliver food by requiring customers to request items such as plastic utensils, extra containers, condiment packs and/or napkins. Currently, an estimated 60 percent of Americans order takeout or delivery at least once a week, and online ordering is growing 300 percent ... 27 May 2024 by Susanne Jansson

The Very Last Surrender

The history textbooks tell us that the end of the Civil War was when General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. Another candidate for the war’s conclusion has an anniversary this weekend: Two months after Appomattox, on June 2, General Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of Confederate forces west of the Mississippi River, surrendered in Galveston, Texas. Once again, the textbooks leave out the Native Americans, because the very, very last Confederate field general to surrender and thus truly end the Civil War was Stand Watie. Born Standhope Uwatie on December 12, ... by Tom Clavin

Strength in Numbers

The Village of Southampton has become the first municipality on Long Island to completely ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers. The process was deliberative and inclusive, with an emphasis on a phase-out. Southampton Village’s deputy mayor, Gina Arresta, said last week that when “I first became a village trustee four years ago,” there was a “push from residents” for a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers. A task force was put together that she led, which consisted of people from “all sides — contractors, landscapers, residents, members of the village’s Environment Committee. You have to bring people together.” And the ... by Karl Grossman

Community News, May 30

by Staff Writer

Pea Soup

The storm was horrible, and its timing, too: A solid ocean chill sat upon us, and young, tender things perished. The first planting of cucumbers lost. Though covered, I couldn’t fool them. The weather was not ready, the conditions not right; nature imposes another round. You hope. There were eight trays held out, still living inside the greenhouse — they weren’t exposed. Sit tight, I tell them, the sun eventually will come out. So, too, lost are the baby birds. Washed from ill-conceived nests near gutters, swept from the branches, are featherless hatchlings, ill-timed in their birth. Poof. Little bodies, ... 21 May 2024 by Marilee Foster

Home of the Eternal Flame

Everyone has heard of Arlington National Cemetery, one of the two cemeteries in the National Cemetery System operated by the U.S. Army. It was established in May 1864 on an estate in Virginia confiscated by the federal government from Confederate General Robert E. Lee. It now comprises 639 acres. Nearly 400,000 people are buried at the cemetery, with two dozen funerals held each weekday and six to eight services on Saturday. Most people know of the more famous residents there, including Supreme Court justices, military generals, politicians, astronauts, explorers, former presidents, and others prominent in history textbooks. But what of ... 20 May 2024 by Tom Clavin

A Battleground

Sixty years ago, the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair opened. “Like a giant playground” was the headline last month in Newsday in a five-page spread, the cover story of its “LI Life” section, based on a quote from a fairgoer describing it. I was there on opening day to do a story about members of the Suffolk County chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality joining in a major protest about discrimination in hiring at the fair. My story was ultimately headlined: “Jail Pavilion for Suffolk CORE.” For it was not a “playground” but more like a battleground that day. ... by Karl Grossman

VIEWPOINT: Blooms of Remembrance

By Biddle Duke When lilacs make their annual miraculous appearance along the roadways and fence lines, their color and fragrance send me spinning into our history. They are blooms of remembrance. It is little wonder. Lilacs and Memorial Day have been intertwined since the day to honor Civil War veterans was established. In this part of the world, the pale violet-and-white flowers always emerge in mid to late May, right around Decoration Day, as it was originally called — Decoration Day, because it was specifically timed so that people might gather up the season’s brightest blossoms to decorate the graves ... by BIDDLE DUKE

Community News, May 23

YOUTH CORNER Circle of Fun The East Hampton Library, 159 Main Street in East Hampton, ... by Staff Writer