Community News, May 5 - 27 East

Community News, May 5

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Aleksandra Kardwell, Symona Kitchen, Evelina Miles and Deidre Humen at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night.    LISA TAMBURINI

Aleksandra Kardwell, Symona Kitchen, Evelina Miles and Deidre Humen at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night. LISA TAMBURINI

Jon Semlear, Denise Burke and Terri and Seamus Doyle at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night,    LISA TAMBURINI

Jon Semlear, Denise Burke and Terri and Seamus Doyle at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night, LISA TAMBURINI

Kathleen McMahon, Mary Slattery, Cathy Harmon and Pam Jackson at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night.  LISA TAMBURINI

Kathleen McMahon, Mary Slattery, Cathy Harmon and Pam Jackson at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night. LISA TAMBURINI

Mago and Sharyn Bradford at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night.   LISA TAMBURINI

Mago and Sharyn Bradford at the Parrish Art Museum's Spring Fling on Saturday night. LISA TAMBURINI

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface.  Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday.  COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Scout Troop 455 ventured to New Paltz to climb “the Gunks” (Shawangunk Mountains) last week with five Scouts and four leaders attended the event that comprised vertical climbing and rappelling down a 90-foot shear rockface. Following the climb, the Scouts camped overnight and returned home on Sunday. COURTESY SCOUT TROOP 455

Members of the Wainscott Tree Society presided over the planting of a dogwood tree at Wainscott Green Friday. The tree was donated by Michael Derrig of Landscape Detail, whose workers planted the tree following the ceremony.    KYRIL BROMLEY

Members of the Wainscott Tree Society presided over the planting of a dogwood tree at Wainscott Green Friday. The tree was donated by Michael Derrig of Landscape Detail, whose workers planted the tree following the ceremony. KYRIL BROMLEY

Brian Doyle with his son Brendan, a fourth-grader at Tuckahoe School who, while on his way to batting practice recently found a bunny tangled in the batting cage netting.  He ran to the Bridgehampton Fire Station and found Paul Rittenhouse, a paramedic, who assisted him in removing the exhausted bunny from the netting and returning it to his mother. COURTESY BRIAN DOYLE

Brian Doyle with his son Brendan, a fourth-grader at Tuckahoe School who, while on his way to batting practice recently found a bunny tangled in the batting cage netting. He ran to the Bridgehampton Fire Station and found Paul Rittenhouse, a paramedic, who assisted him in removing the exhausted bunny from the netting and returning it to his mother. COURTESY BRIAN DOYLE

authorStaff Writer on May 5, 2022
MONTAUK Nature Walks Planned  Earlier this year, the Concerned Citizens of Montauk and Third House Nature Center Inc. unveiled the Lindley-Morrison Signature Walks, a series of four annual hikes honoring... more

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