Hamptons Hot Jobs: Roofers Tolerate Temperatures For The High Life - 27 East

Hamptons Hot Jobs: Roofers Tolerate Temperatures For The High Life

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Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday.  DANA SHAW

Roofers from EML Construction on the job in Southampton Village on Monday. DANA SHAW

By george wambold on Aug 14, 2012
Greg Morrison’s red T-shirt, faded and sweat-drenched, might incite dread in anyone accustomed to working in an air-conditioned office. July 2012 was the hottest month since the National Weather Service... more

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