Overwhelming Support for Steinbeck Purchase Offered at Southampton Town Board Hearing on Use of Community Preservation Fund Revenue - 27 East

Overwhelming Support for Steinbeck Purchase Offered at Southampton Town Board Hearing on Use of Community Preservation Fund Revenue

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Southampton Town acting CPF Director Jacqueline Fenlon.  DANA SHAW

Southampton Town acting CPF Director Jacqueline Fenlon. DANA SHAW

Southampton Town Board member Tommy Jon Schiavoni.    DANA SHAW

Southampton Town Board member Tommy Jon Schiavoni. DANA SHAW

Kathryn Szoka

Kathryn Szoka

April Gornik

April Gornik

Author Jay Jay McInerney

Author Jay Jay McInerney

Nada Barry

Nada Barry

Playwright Keith Reddin

Playwright Keith Reddin

Kathleen Mulcahy

Kathleen Mulcahy

authorStephen J. Kotz on Jan 25, 2023
There was unanimous support among the two dozen people who addressed the Southampton Town Board on Tuesday for the expenditure of $11.2 million from the Community Preservation Fund to buy... more

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