Pierson Is Alone in Banning Cellphones During School Day - 27 East

Pierson Is Alone in Banning Cellphones During School Day

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Pierson Middle High School students placing their phones in the Yondr pouches at the start of the school day on Monday, with the help of school security guard Patty Burns. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

Pierson Middle High School students placing their phones in the Yondr pouches at the start of the school day on Monday, with the help of school security guard Patty Burns. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

Pierson Middle High School students placing their phones in the Yondr pouches at the start of the school day on Monday, with the help of school security guard Patty Burns. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

Pierson Middle High School students placing their phones in the Yondr pouches at the start of the school day on Monday, with the help of school security guard Patty Burns. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. A circular magnet locks and unlocks the pouches each day. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. A circular magnet locks and unlocks the pouches each day. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. Students keep the pouches with them during the school day but cannot open them.  KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. Students keep the pouches with them during the school day but cannot open them. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. A circular magnet locks and unlocks the pouches each day. Teachers report plenty of benefits from the new system, including increased focus and more face-to-face conversations between students. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

The Pierson Middle High School implemented the Yondr system at the start of this school year, requiring students to place their cell phones in a magnetically locked pouch at the start of each day. A circular magnet locks and unlocks the pouches each day. Teachers report plenty of benefits from the new system, including increased focus and more face-to-face conversations between students. KYRIL BROMLEY PHOTOS

Many teachers in the Hampton Bays school district require their students to place their phones in cubbies in a wall unit at the front of the classroom to ensure the phones are not a distraction to students while class is in session. COURTESY HAMPTON BAYS SCHOOLS

Many teachers in the Hampton Bays school district require their students to place their phones in cubbies in a wall unit at the front of the classroom to ensure the phones are not a distraction to students while class is in session. COURTESY HAMPTON BAYS SCHOOLS

Many teachers in the Hampton Bays school district require their students to place their phones in cubbies in a wall unit at the front of the classroom to ensure the phones are not a distraction to students while class is in session. COURTESY HAMPTON BAYS SCHOOLS

Many teachers in the Hampton Bays school district require their students to place their phones in cubbies in a wall unit at the front of the classroom to ensure the phones are not a distraction to students while class is in session. COURTESY HAMPTON BAYS SCHOOLS

Students at Pierson High chat and enjoy their lunches instead of checking their phones.  DANA SHAW

Students at Pierson High chat and enjoy their lunches instead of checking their phones. DANA SHAW

Students at Pierson High chat and enjoy their lunches instead of checking their phones.  DANA SHAW

Students at Pierson High chat and enjoy their lunches instead of checking their phones. DANA SHAW

Pierson art teacher Joe Bartolotto said his negative interactions with students have gone down 90 percent since the school adopted the Yondr system, which prevents students from accessing their cellphones during the school day. KYRIL BROMLEY

Pierson art teacher Joe Bartolotto said his negative interactions with students have gone down 90 percent since the school adopted the Yondr system, which prevents students from accessing their cellphones during the school day. KYRIL BROMLEY

Pierson art teacher Joe Bartolotto said his negative interactions with students have gone down 90 percent since the school adopted the Yondr system, which prevents students from accessing their cellphones during the school day. KYRIL BROMLEY

Pierson art teacher Joe Bartolotto said his negative interactions with students have gone down 90 percent since the school adopted the Yondr system, which prevents students from accessing their cellphones during the school day. KYRIL BROMLEY

authorCailin Riley on Feb 14, 2024
Joe Bartolotto began his career as a high school art teacher in the Sag Harbor School District in 1995. He has always been one of those teachers the students love,... more

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